MAJ. GEN. JENS A. DOE

Jens A. Doe was born in Chicago, Illinois, on 20 June 1891. He graduated from the Military Academy and was appointed a second lieutenant on 12 June 1914. He served with the 11th Infantry at Texas City, Texas, until December 1914 and then moved to Naco, Arizona, and a few weeks later to Douglas, Arizona, where he remained until May 1917 with his regiment. Meanwhile he was promoted to first lieutenant on 1 July 1916 and to captain on 15 May 1917. Between May and August 1917 he served at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, with the 11th Infantry and then enrolled in the Machine-Gun Course of the Infantry and Artillery School at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, from which he graduated in October 1917. He became an instructor at a division school at Fort Oglethorpe and in December 1917 assumed command of the 15th Machine-Gun Battalion at that post.

He sailed for France in April 1918. He was made a major (temporary) on 7 June 1918 and was 5th Division Machine-Gun Officer in France from June to July 1918, then was assigned as commanding officer of the l4th Machine-Gun Battalion. He participated in the St. Mihiel and the Meuse-Argonne offensives. He organized and became instructor in the Army Machine Gun School at Langres, France, in November 1918, and one month later was assigned as an instructor at the II Corps Schools. He enrolled in the Artillery Center, Chattillon, France, in May 1919, was graduated one month later and assigned to the 61st Infantry. He returned to the United States with this unit in June, 1919, and went to Camp Benning, Georgia, where in September 1919 he became an instructor at the Infantry School. His majority was made permanent on 1 July 1920. He enrolled in the Field Officers' Course of the Infantry School in September 1921, and was graduated in May 1922. He then was assigned to the 2d Infantry at Fort Sheridan, Illinois. He was Machine-Gun Officer at Camp Custer, Michigan, from May to July 1923, then was assigned to duty at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

He enrolled in the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, m August 1925, and following his graduation in June 1926, he went to China for duty with the 15th Infantry at Tientsin until January 1930. He then returned to the United States and joined the l6th Infantry at Fort Jay, New York. He commanded the Machine-Gun School of the 1st Brigade at Camp Dix, New Jersey, from April to August 1932, after which he enrolled in the Army War College at Washington, D.C., from which he graduated the following June. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 1 January 1936 and served as instructor at the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth until June 1937. His next assignment was as professor of military science and tactics at the University of California at Berkeley.

In September 1940, he joined the 7th Division at Fort Ord, California, and assumed command of the 17th Infantry at that post in February 1941. He was promoted to colonel (temporary) on 26 June 1941 and in April 1942 he was transferred with the 17th Infantry to San Luis Obispo, California, where he remained until June 1942, when he was given an assignment in the South Pacific Theater of Operations.

In World War II , Colonel Doe first saw action in the Buna campaign when the l63d Infantry of the 41st Division, under his command, destroyed the Japanese positions in the center, on the Sanananda Track. This action resulted in his promotion to brigadier general (temporary) 2 February 1943 when he became Assistant Division Commander of the 41st Division. In connection with the Hollandia landing. General Doe commanded the task force landing at Aitape and prior to the Biak operation he landed in the Toem-Wakde area with his force. Upon completion of this mission he relinquished command of the task force and rejoined his division in time for the Biak landing. In August 1944 he became Commanding General of the 41st Division and was promoted to major general (temporary) on 1 August 1944. During February and March 1945, he directed landings of the Jungleers at Palawan, Zamboanga, Tawi-Tawi and Jolo in the Southern Philippines, and in October of that year led his troops into the Hiro-Kure-Hiroshima area of conquered Japan.

When the 41st Division was inactivated in Japan in January 1946, General Doe returned to the United States for a tour of duty in the War Department. He assumed command of the 5th Division at Camp Campbell, Kentucky, on 9 August 1946 and on 29 September, the same year, became Commanding General of the 3d Infantry Division.  General Doe was one of the most highly decorated division commanders in the Pacific Theater. His decorations included the Silver Star with two oak leaf clusters. Distinguished Service Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Air Medal, and the Purple Heart.

His citation for the Distinguished Service Cross awarded in 1943, reads in part as follows: For extraordinary heroism in action near Sanananda, New Guinea, on January 21 and 22, 1943. As commander of an infantry regiment which was engaged in wiping out the remaining points of enemy resistance. Brigadier General Doe distinguished himself by his coolness and gallantry under fire. In the reduction of these strongly fortified areas his outstanding leadership and courageous conduct were a continuous inspiration to his troops. Brigadier General Doe's presence in the most forward areas and his disregard of personal danger were largely responsible for the high morale of his troops and the successful outcome of these operations.

An Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star earned in World War II was presented to him with this citation: In the Southwest Pacific in June 1944, he displayed outstanding leadership and devotion to duty under Japanese machine-gun, rifle and mortar fire, and in personally moving among forward assault troops. By his calm manner and courageous actions, he greatly assisted the advance. A second Oak Leaf Cluster to the Silver Star was presented in 1945 and the citation read:  For gallantry in action at Zamboanga, Mindanao, P.I. from 10 March 45 to 23 April 45. During this time in the capacity of Division Commander, General Doe directed the initial assault and the consequent capture of Zamboanga. His outstanding leadership, indomitable courage and skillful tactical knowledge resulted in his division securing a firm foothold on Mindanao Island. On many occasions without regard to his personal safety, he went forward to units engaged in heavy fighting in order to gain first-hand information about the tactical situation.

He received the Air Medal in 1945 for numerous flights over Japanese positions and his Distinguished Service Medal, awarded in 1945, was for the Aitape and Wakde campaigns. The Oak Leaf Cluster to the Distinguished Service Medal was awarded for service on Biak. General Doe was appointed permanent major general in 1948 with rank from 6 September 1944.

 

MAJ. GEN. HORACE H. FULLER

Horace H. Fuller was born on 10 August 1886 at Fort Meade, South Dakota. He was graduated from the Military Academy and appointed a second lieutenant in the Cavalry on 11 June 1909. He served with the 11th Cavalry at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, until April 1914. He was transferred to the 7th Cavalry and served at Fort William McKinley, Philippine Islands, from May to September 1914, and at Camp Stotsenburg, Philippine Islands, to May 1916. In the meantime, he was assigned to the 8th Cavalry. He was promoted to first lieutenant on 12 June 1916 and transferred to the Field Artillery, to rank from 1 July 1916. Returning to the United States, he served at Fort Bliss, Texas, with the 17th Cavalry to May 1917. He was promoted to captain on 15 May 1917.

In July, of that year, he was transferred to the 11th Field Artillery, serving at Douglas, Arizona. In November 1917 he was ordered to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as a student at the School of Fire for Field Artillery, remaining there until January 1918. He rejoined the 11th Field Artillery at Douglas and accompanied the unit to Fort Sill where he served until July 1918. His temporary promotion to major came on 8 January 1918. Sailing to France in October, 1918, he joined the 108th Field Artillery at Veronnes in the Argonne. He participated in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and in the Ypres-Lys Offensive, in command of the 108th. He earned his lieutenant colonelcy (temporary) on 11 September 1918. He commanded the 109th Field Artillery to March 1919 and then served with the Motor Transport Corps until January 1920, when he was assigned to duty with the Graves Registration Service. He reverted to his permanent rank of captain on 15 April 1920, and was promoted to major on 1 July 1920.

He returned to the United States and served at Fort Benning, Georgia, with the 83d Field Artillery from January 1921 to September 1922. He became a student at the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and completed the course in June 1923 as a distinguished graduate. He remained at the school as an instructor until August 1927 and then attended the Army War College, Washington, D. C, where he graduated in June 1928. His next station was at the Presidio of Monterey, California, with the 76th Field Artillery, where he served until November 1929, when he returned to Washington for a tour with the General Staff Corps. He served as Chief of the Publications and Extension Course Section, Operations and Training Branch, War Department General Staff, until September 1933, when he was ordered to duty with the 6th Field Artillery at Fort Hoyle, Maryland.

A promotion to lieutenant colonel came on 1 May 1934 and he was graduated from the Field Officers' Course at the Chemical Warfare School, Edgewood Arsenal, Maryland, in August 1935, and was assigned to duty as Military Attache at Paris, France. He served in Paris until August 1940, in the meantime getting his eagles on 1 July 1938. He returned to the United States in August 1940, and following temporary duty in Washington, he was assigned to take a refresher course at the Field Artillery School at Fort Sill in October 1940, preliminary to duty with the 3d Infantry Division with headquarters at Fort Lewis, Washington. He was also promoted to brigadier general (temporary) on 1 October 1940. In June 1941 he was transferred to Fort Leavenworth as Commandant of the Command and General Staff School. He was assigned to command the 41st Division at Fort Lewis in December 1941 and on 15 December that year won his temporary promotion to major general. He accompanied the Division to the Southwest Pacific Area and in August 1944 became President of the U. S. Army Forces, in the Far East Board. The following November he was made Deputy Chief of Staff, Southeast Asia Command.

He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal in 1944, with the accompanying citation: For service in the Southwest Pacific Area from April 6, 1942, to June 17, 1944. Commanding one of the first Infantry divisions to arrive in the theater, he demonstrated exceptional ability and sound judgment in bringing his division to a high state of efficiency in preparation for jungle combat. He successfully commanded his division in the defense of the Oro Bay-Gona Area and in operations against the enemy from Gona to Morobe, while elements of his division participated in the landing at Nassau Bay and the subsequent drive on Salamaua. Later he led his division in the amphibious assaults against Hollandia and Biak Island. Elements of his division made the successful initial landings at Aitape and in the Wake Island-Sarmi Area. In all attacks he inflicted decisive defeat on an experienced enemy. His personal courage and inspiring leadership made possible the able execution of assigned missions, and contributed materially to our success in dislodging the enemy and forcing him to relinquish his conquests.

 

MAJ. GEN. GEORGE A. WHITE

George A. White was born in Illinois on 18 July 1880. His first military experience was as a private in the Infantry in the Utah National Guard on 1 August 1895. He entered the Federal service for duty in the Spanish-American War as a musician in the Artillery, serving until 21 December 1898. He reentered the Utah State service on 15 July 1899 and served as private and first sergeant in the Infantry until 3 May 1903. He moved to Oregon where he enlisted as a private in the Oregon National Guard on 4 August 1907, and the following day, 5 August 1907, he was appointed a first lieutenant of Infantry in the Oregon National Guard. His promotion to captain came on 21 March 1911; to major, AGD, on 14 May 1915, and to brigadier general on 14 May 1915, serving in this rank until 26 June 1916. He was mustered into Federal service for the Border crisis as a captain in the Cavalry on 27 June 1916. He served until 22 February 1917 when he was demobilized and again became brigadier general, AGD.

During World War I he was mustered into Federal service on 10 September 1917 as a major, AGD, and was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 13  November 1918. Following de-mobilization on 23 July 1919, he was appointed colonel, AGD, National Guard of Oregon, on 23 June 1920, and was promoted to brigadier general on 8 June 1922 and to brigadier general of the line on 23 July 1923. General White was graduated from the National Guard Officers' Course, Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, in 1926; and from the Military Intelligence Course of the Army War College, Washington, D. C, in 1928. He was promoted to major general on 3 January 1930.

During World War II , General White was mustered into the Federal service on 16 September 1940. He became commanding general of the 41st Division which was in training at Fort Lewis, Washington. He died on 23 November 1941. 

 

BRIG. GEN. HAROLD HANEY

Harold Haney was born at Brazil, Indiana, on 2 January 1894. After serving as an enlisted man for three years, he was commissioned a second lieutenant of Infantry in the Regular Army on 9 August 1917, and was promoted to first lieutenant the same day. Between August 1917 and August 1919 he served with the 57th Infantry at San Benito, Beaumont, and Camp Logan, Texas, later moving with that regiment to Camp Pike, Arkansas. In September 1919 he joined the American forces in Germany, where he first served with the 5th Infantry and later commanded a quartermaster detachment. He served with the Quartermaster Corps for two years, being promoted to captain on 1 July 1920. He served for a time as salvage officer with the American forces then returned to the United States in May 1922 and was assigned to Camp Dix, New Jersey. There he served as camp salvage officer and as company commander with the 16th Infantry, in September 1923 moving with that regiment to Fort Jay, N.Y.

He was assigned to the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia, in October 1924, where he completed the Company Officers' Course in June 1925. He then went to Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, as assistant professor of military science and tactics. After serving five years in that capacity, he was assigned to the 6th Infantry at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, where he became a company commander and plans and training officer of the 2d Battalion. In March 1933 he joined the 15th Infantry at Tientsin, China, and remained there until September 1935, meanwhile having been promoted to major on 1 August 1935.

He returned to Fort Jay and was given command of the 3d Battalion, 16th Infantry. In July 1937 he became assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Alabama at University, Alabama, and the following September was enrolled as a student at the Command and General Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Upon completion of his studies in June 1939 he became chairman and chief of the Heavy Weapons Section, and later, assistant executive officer at the Infantry School. His promotion to lieutenant colonel became effective 9 August 1940 and on 24 December 1941 he was promoted to colonel (temporary). In October 1942 he was assigned to the Southwest Pacific Area and served there until November 1943 as commandant of the Officer Candidate School. He later was assigned to the 41st Division and became Assistant Division Commander, receiving his promotion to brigadier general on 7 January 1945.  On 6 March 1946 he reverted to his permanent rank of lieutenant colonel and was promoted to colonel (temporary).

 

BRIG. GEN. THOMAS E. RILEA

Thomas E. Rilea was born in Chicago, Illinois, on 5 May 1895. He first entered military service by enlisting in the National Guard of Oregon as a private in the Infantry on 8 December 1914, while attending Oregon Institute of Technology, from which he was graduated in 1916 with the degree of Electrical Engineer. In that same year he served on Federal duty with the National Guard as bugler and corporal on the Mexican border. He was again mustered into Federal service on 25 March 1917, just prior to the outbreak of World War I , serving as a sergeant and regimental sergeant-major of Infantry from 25 March 1917 to 16 June 1918, when he was commissioned second lieutenant in the Adjutant General's Department.

His first commissioned service was on Federal duty with the National Guard in the United States and with the American Expeditionary Forces in France. He was awarded the Purple Heart and was cited by the Oregon Legislature for outstanding service. He was promoted to first lieutenant on 24 February 1919, and to captain on 31 May 1919. He was mustered out of Federal service on 25 September 1919 and was appointed captain on 8 June 1921, major on 17 November 1924, lieutenant colonel on 16 March 1927, and brigadier general on 9 January 1931.

Following his demobilization after World War I he became Executive Officer of the Oregon National Guard. From 1934 to 1935 he was Vice President of the National Guard Association, and from 1935 to 1936 he was its President. In February 1942 he was relieved of assignment as commanding general of the 82d Infantry Brigade and made assistant commander of the 41st Division. In February 1943 he was assigned to Headquarters, Services of Supply, in the Southwest Pacific Area, and a month later was given command of Base Section 17, at Sydney, Australia. In February 1945 he was hospitalized at Barnes General Hospital, Vancouver Barracks, Washington and in July 1945 was assigned to the Infantry Replacement Training Center at Fort McClellan, Alabama.

 

BRIG. GEN. EDWIN A. ZUNDEL

Edwin Albert Zundel was born at Greensbure, Pennsylvania, on 29 March 1893. He was graduated from the United States Military Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree and commissioned second lieutenant of Field Artillery on 12 June 1915.  He served on border duty at Fort Sam Houston, Fort Bliss and Laredo, Texas, and then at Nogales, Arizona, with various Field Artillery regiments from June 1915 to June 1917. He was promoted to first lieutenant on 1 July 1916 and to captain on 15 May 1917. He then joined the 11th Field Artillery at Douglas, Arizona, and from September to December 1917 was detailed to Leon Springs, Texas, for duty at the 2d Officers' Training Camp, after which he returned to Douglas to rejoin the 11th Field Artillery. From February to May 1918, he was a student at the School of Fire, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and then rejoined the 11th Field Artillery.

He was promoted to major (temporary) on 3 July 1918 and that month sailed to France with his regiment. The following month he became a battalion commander of the 78th Field Artillery, at Valdahon, France. From November 1918 to April 1919, he served as a battalion commander of the 305th Field Artillery, and then returned to the United States. While stationed in France he participated in engagements in the Meuse-Argonne and Defensive Sector. His next assignment was at Camp Meade, Maryland, where he served as assistant camp judge advocate until November 1919, when he moved to San Antonio, Texas, as assistant to the zone supply officer. From January to May 1920, he was assistant to the depot quartermaster, San Antonio GeneralSupply Depot, and then sailed to Hawaii, where he was named assistant to the department quartermaster at Headquarters, Hawaiian Department, in Honolulu. Meanwhile, he had reverted to captain on 6 May 1920 but was promoted to major on 1 July that same year. He joined the 13th Field Artillery at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, in October 1920, as a battalion commander, and served in this capacity until he returned to the United States in July 1923.

He served as instructor at the United States Military Academy until September 1927, when he was assigned as a student at the Field Artillery School at Fort Sill. He was graduated in June 1928, and then was detailed to the Command  and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He completed the two-year course in June 1930, after which he proceeded to Providence, Rhode Island, as an instructor of the 68th Field Artillery Brigade and 103d Field Artillery, Rhode Island National Guard. He was ordered to Washington, D. C, for duty with the Regulations Division, National Guard Bureau, in  September 1934, and in March 1935 was made assistant to the chief of Operations and Organization Division. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 1 May 1936. In October 1938 he took a refresher course at the Field Artillery School and then went to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as commander of the 2d Battalion, 83d Field Artillery. He moved to Fort Benning, Georgia, in command of the 83d Field Artillery in July 1940, and also served concurrently as artillery officer of the 4th Infantry Division. He became commanding officer of the 42d Field Artillery Battalion at Fort Benning in October 1940 and one year later assumed command of the 1st Antitank Group at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, and was promoted to colonel (temporary) on 14 October 1941. The following December he was made artillery officer of II Corps at Wilmington, Delaware, later moving to Jacksonville, Florida, in the same capacity.

In June 1942 he was designated artillery officer of XI Corps at Chicago, Illinois, and in February 1943 was assigned to Sixth Army as artillery officer in the Southwest Pacific. He was made a permanent colonel on 14 October 1943. As artillery officer of Sixth Army he participated in landings on Woodlark and Kiriwina Islands and in the landings at Arawe and Cape Gloucester on New Britain, and at Saidor, Aitape and Hollandia on New Guinea, and the Admiralty Islands. On 24 May 1944 he was promoted to brigadier general (temporary) and assumed command of the 41st Division Artillery at Hollandia. In this  capacity he participated in operations on Wakde and Biak, and in the Philippines.

He accompanied the 41st Division into Japan and returned to the United States in February 1946, being assigned as artillery officer of Fourth Army. He was awarded the Legion of Merit as Sixth Army Artillery Officer, "for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services in the Southwest Pacific area from 6 Februay 1943 to 4 May 1944."  An oak leaf cluster to the Legion of Merit was awarded to him as 41st Division Artillery commander for the Biak campaign and for his part in planning and preparing the Palawan and Zamboanga campaigns. He received the Silver Star for gallantry in action at Ibdi, Biak Island, on 29 May 1944, and the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious achievement in military operations against the enemy on Mindanao from 10 March 1945 to 25 April 1945. In July 1945 he was awarded the Air Medal for numerous operational flights in Cub planes over enemy-held territory during the operations on Biak and Mindanao. General Zundel was appointed permanent brigadier general in 1948 with rank from 7 July 1944.

 

BRIG. GEN. RALPH WALDO COANE

Ralph W. Coane was born in Oakland, California, on 17 October 1891. He enlisted on 5 January 1918 for duty at the Officers' Training School at Camp Kearny, California. He served as a sergeant with the l43d Field Artillery at Camp Kearny and was commissioned a second lieutenant on 28 May 1918. He was honorably discharged on 18 January 1919, and was appointed a second lieutenant of Field Artillery of the California National Guard on that same date. He was commissioned first lieutenant of Field Artillery, Officers' Reserve Corps, on 13 January 1925; promoted to captain. Officers' Reserve Corps, on 21 July 1930, to major on 8 June 1936, to colonel on 15 January 1941, and to brigadier general (temporary) on 17 March 1942.

General Coane's first assignment after being commissioned was with the 115th Ammunition Troop with which he went overseas in August 1918. He  served with that unit until October 1918, when he was transferred to the 143d Field Artillery, then stationed at Camp de Souge, France. He attended the Artillery School of Fire there. As a Reserve officer he was called to active duty for short periods of training. He was ordered to extended active duty at Santa Barbara, California, on 3 February 1941, and was assigned to duty with the l44th Field Artillery at Fort Lewis, Washington. He was assigned as artillery commander, 41st Infantry Division, Fort Lewis, in March 1942, and the following month accompanied the Division overseas. As a result of wounds received in action, he was returned to the United States in July 1944 and, following hospitalization at Hoff General Hospital at Santa Barbara, California, he was assigned in November 1944 to command the I4th Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, Special Troops, Fourth Army, at Camp Polk, Louisiana.

 

BRIG. GEN. ALBERT H. BEEBE

Albert H. Beebe, Washington National Guard, entered the military service of the State of Washington as an enlisted man on 17 July 1907 in Company L, 2d Washington Infantry, where he remained until 28 October 1909. He was then transferred to the Coast Artillery Corps, where he served as a sergeant and sergeant-major until 25 May 1910. On 30 July 1917 he enlisted in Company B, 3d Infantry, Washington State Guard, and on 13 August 1917 he was  commissioned a captain in the Infantry, Washington State Guard, and assigned to the 3d Infantry Regiment. On 3 January 1919 he was promoted to major. On 10 January 1921 he was promoted to lieutenant colonel in the Field Artillery and was assigned as executive officer of the l46th Field Artillery. On 30 March 1929 he took command of that regiment and on 3 May 1929 he was promoted to colonel. He continued in command of the I46th until he was promoted to brigadier general and assigned to command the 66th Field Artillery Brigade on 10 October 1934.

General Beebe entered Federal service on 16 September 1940 in command of the 66th Field Artillery Brigade but was released from Federal service on 25 September because of physical disability. On 28 August 1942, he was appointed major general on the retired list of the Washington National Guard. He was born at Versailles, New York, on 24 February 1878, and graduated from Cornell University in 1901 with the degree of Bachelor of Law. 

 

MAJ. GEN. CARLOS A. PENINGTON

Carlos A. Penington was born in Wilmington, Illinois, on 3 May 1878. He enlisted in Company D, 1st Washington Volunteers at Seattle, Washington, on 30 March 1898 and served with that unit in the Philippine Islands during the Spanish-American War until he was mustered out on 1 November 1899. He  reenlisted in Company A, 2d Washington Infantry, on 27 April 1909, and remained as an enlisted man with that unit until commissioned a first lieutenant inthe same company on 9 June 1909. On 28 October 1909 he was transferred to the Coast Artillery Corps, and assigned to the regimental staff of the CAC, Washington National Guard.

In September 1914 he was promoted to captain and was made a major on 9 May 1916 when he was assigned as Coast Artillery Battalion commander and as State Inspector. From 15 June 1916 to 16 November 1916, he was on active duty at Tacoma, Washington, in charge of recruiting. On 17 November 1916 he was transferred to the Inspector General's Department, and assigned as State Inspector and on 9 June 1917 he was transferred to the  Quartermaster Corps and assigned as State Quartermaster.

On 2 August 1917 he entered Federal service as Assistant Division Quartermaster, 41st Division, going overseas with the Division in December 1917. In France he served as Quartermaster of the 77th Division. He was promoted to lieutenant colonel on 10 November 1918 and was relieved from active Federal service on 6 August 1919.  On 23 February 1920 he was commissioned a lieutenant colonel, QMC, in the Organized Reserves, and was assigned as Quartermaster, 62d Cavalry Division. On 17 May 1929 he transferred to the Washington National Guard and was assigned as Quartermaster of the 41st Division. He was promoted to colonel in the Field Artillery of the W N G on 10 April 1930 and assumed command of the l48th Field Artillery with headquarters in Tacoma. His promotion to brigadier general was effective 24 July 1934 and he was assigned as commander of the 81st Infantry Brigade of the 41st Division. He entered Federal service in this capacity on 16 September 1940 but because of physical disability incurred in line of duty he retired on 16 December 1941. On 28 August 1942 he was made major general on the retired list of the Washington National Guard.

After World War I , General Penington took an active part in the organization of the U.S. Veterans Bureau in Washington, D. C, and as an assistant director organized and operated the Insurance Division of the Bureau for a number of years. Later he was business manager of the Veterans' Hospital at Fort Bayard, New Mexico, and at American Lake, Washington. He died at Madigan General Hospital on 26 August 1947.